Design Process

On Thursday, Oct. 1, 2015, the students of the course “Scienza e Applicazioni del Pensiero Creativo” worked in teams to sketch a model of the Design Process. Here you can find the models drawn by the 13 teams.

 

   

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Vincent Antonellini, Daniele Antonini, Selene Bonato, Giulio Fabbri 

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Maite Nannini, Giulia Tonioni 

 20151002095235978        

Clelia Liberti, Michela Voltarelli, Virginia Vaccari, Claudia Gelmini         

 

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Simona Colitti, Andrea Libanori, Giovanni M. Lombardo, Elena Macciantelli, Mario Viniello

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Brian Scalini, Jacopo Pedrona, Mattia Pieretti, Gabriele Mascagni

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Davide Balsamini, Francesco Gualandi 

20151002095403081 

Lorenza Maggio, Ludovica Rosato, Serena Sacchetto, Virginia Viapiano   

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Bianca Draghetti, Claudia Fradeani     

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Francesco Calzolari, Antonio Laganà, Andrea Montalbani, Francesco Venditti      

 

 

20151002095107350

 

 

Andrea Ascani, Cesare Bartoccini                      

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Description of the course

School of Engineering and Architecture – Telecommunications Engineering 

University of Bologna

Learning outcomes

At the end of the course students gain knowledge and earnings from the history of science, theoretical foundations of creative thinking, cognitive modelling and the DIMAI model in particular, along with strategies and processes for specific thinking stages. Innovation topics will be handled with the analysis of hurdles and strategies for success, through the application to study cases.  

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Description of the course

School of Engineering and Architecture – Industrial Design 

University of Bologna

Learning outcomes

At the end of this class, the student will possess scientifically sound notions about the creative thinking process, along with the pragmatic application of the principles for the generation of new ideas. The student will master theoretical and methodological notions regarding the cognitive and conative components which are at the very basis of the creative process. Particular emphasis will be placed onto universal strategies, applicable to diversified domains, which allow to increase awareness and efficacy of the overall creative thinking exercise. 

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On the Path Towards the Science of Creative Thinking

G.E. CORAZZA, S. AGNOLI

Abstract 

In this introductory Chapter, we state the fundamental elements that underpin the science of creative thinking, recognizing at the same time that we are following a path towards the establishment of that science, and that many challenges are yet to be met. Considering theoretical models for the creative thinking process, we discuss the minimum number of stages, the concept of optimal originality, and we review the most important existing models, outlining their features and limitations. The discussion then moves from the individual to the social level. After reviewing the generally accepted approaches in social creativity analysis, we call for balanced fusion of the individual and social points of view, avoiding artificial contrasts. Two macro domains are then analysed: engineering and design and art. In the former, we introduce the concepts of creative reproduction of nature, extension of capabilities and of conditions for life, and we discuss the use of metaphors in various forms. For the latter, we start with a scientific definition of inspiration, then move on to discuss the delicate balance between discipline and spontaneity in artistic education. Also, we touch upon the state-of-the-art of artificial creators that can produce mimicking the style of great artists. We conclude the Chapter by addressing some areas which we consider to be both urgent and necessary in the development of the science of creative thinking.

Link to the chapter on Springer  

 

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On the impact of ICT over the creative process in humans

G. E. CORAZZA, S. AGNOLI

Abstract

In this paper  we dwell upon the  effect that Information  Society at  large, and the use of ICT technologies in particular, have  on  the  ability  of  humans  in  generating  new  ideas  through  a  creative  thinking  process.  In  order  to  ground  our discussion onto scientific terms,  we first describe  a  general model  of the creative  thinking process, the  DIMAI model, which  identifies  the  main  mental  states  occurring  in  the  mind  of  the  creative  thinker:  drive  and  focus  definition, information  gathering, movement from  idea to  idea, assessment, and implementation. We then move  on to  discuss the facilitators and inhibitors introduced by ICT technologies onto these five mental states, as well as on the overall process, and we show that there are numerous nuances and specificities on both sides, such as the impact of  virtual worlds, self-authoring  tools,  hyper-connectivity,  reduction  of  attention  span,  protection  of  intellectual  property.  Therefore,  the conclusion is that there are many positive as well as negative implications, but without any doubt we  can state that the impact  of  ICT  on  humans  creativity  is  very  significant.  The  future  evolutions  of  technology  are  certain  to  bring  even further implications, including the birth of the creative process for a global distributed brain.

 

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Introducing Irrelevant Information in the Creative Process: the DIMAI model for Fashion Design

G.E. CORAZZA.S. AGNOLI, S. MARTELLO

Abstract

In this article, we describe the DIMAI model for creative thinking, which incorporates the introduction of irrelevant information in order to generate new ideas. The model is applied to the fashion design creativity context, considering both internal and eternal sources of motivation, requirements, and information, including customer needs, socio- cultural trends, and fashion industry requirements. We also provide paradigmatic examples that illustrate a-posteriori the importance of the introduction of anomalies through the application of divergent modifiers. 

 

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Counterpoint as a principle of creativity: extracting divergent modifiers from The Art of Fugue by Johann Sebastian Bach

G. E. CORAZZA, S. AGNOLI, S. MARTELLO

Abstract

The main message carried by this article is that counterpoint can be taken as a model approach for the introduction of contrasting elements, not only in musical composition but also in the generation of ideas in any domain of knowledge. We start by an interdisciplinary review about the power of opposite concepts as constituting elements in nature. This is followed by the description of the DIMAI model for creative thinking, which is founded upon the dual forces of convergent and divergent thinking modalities. The main body of our work is an extraction of divergent modifiers from the Contrapunctus composed by Bach and collected in the Art of Fugue, with simple examples of application to the diversified fields of education and computer science.

Link to the article on Musica Docta

 

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Estimating Creativity with a Multiple-Measurement Approach Within Scientific and Artistic Domains

 S. AGNOLI, G.E. CORAZZA, M.A. RUNCO

Abstract

This article presents the structure and the composition of a newly developed multifaceted test battery for the measurement of creativity within scientific and artistic domains. By integrating existing procedures for the evaluation of creativity, the new battery promises to become a comprehensive assessment of creativity, encompassing both domain-general and domain-specific components. In particular, the test battery was designed for the measurement of the 2 main stages of the creative thinking process: ideation and evaluation. The test battery also includes 2 measures of creative achievement and can be used to assess professional levels of creativity in artistic and scientific creativity, as well as everyday creativity. Because creative thinking is not an isolated phenomenon in human behavior, the battery includes the measurement of 2 constructs, intelligence and personality, both of which are highly relevant for creativity. Preliminary results from a vast administration campaign of this test battery are presented.

Link to the article on Creativity Research Journal 

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An eye-tracking analysis of irrelevance processing as moderator of Openness and creative performance

 S. AGNOLI, l. FRANCHIN, E. RUBALTELLI, G.E. CORAZZA

Abstract

Openness has been identified as one of the personality traits with stronger association to creativity into the Five-Factor Model of personality. But what are the psychological mechanisms that relate Openness and creative performance? The present paper aims at responding to this question, exploring in particular whether the attentional processing of apparently irrelevant information (irrelevance processing) can act as a moderator within the relation between Openness and creativity. To this aim, a visual version of the Unusual Uses Task was developed and, using an eye-tracker methodology, the attentional processing of both information that is central to the task, and information that is “apparently” irrelevant for its execution was measured. The results showed a moderating effect of irrelevance processing on the role of Openness in both creative achievement and originality of the uses produced by the participants, with creativity reaching higher levels in individuals who gave attention to irrelevant information and were characterized by a high level of Openness. These findings establish attentive processing as a central psychological mechanism to explain the relationship between Openness and creativity.

Link to the article on Creativity Research Journal 

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TRIZ as seen through the DIMAI creative thinking modell

S. AGNOLI, G. E. CORAZZA

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to show that TRIZ is not an isolated theory, but a set of tools that can be interpreted in the light of general theoretical models for creativity. In fact, the numerous tools and strategies that TRIZ formulates can be seen as specific instances of the DIMAI model for the creative thinking process, which takes into account environmental, personality, and cognitive factors and postulates five principal states: Drive, Information, Movement, Assessment and Implementation. Letting “strategy” be defined as a sequence of activation of states, components or sub-processes that includes implementation as a final step, we show how TRIZ offers a systematic organization of strategies for the disciplined and aware use of the complex interactions between the cognitive, individual and emotional elements hypothesized into the DIMAI model. The interpretation of TRIZ through the DIMAI model is not only interesting from a theoretical point of view, but it adds an awareness layer which can help both the scientist and the practitioner in dealing systematically and homogeneously with the multiple variables and elements involved in the creative and innovative act, thus enhancing the overall effectiveness.

Link to the article on Procedia Engineering 

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